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Boots on Mars in 10 Years!

Boots on Mars in 10 Years!

MIT Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics; aerospace biomedical engineer, inventor of BioSuitTM planetary spacesuit; NASA Deputy Administrator 2015-2017

To learn more about Dava Newman:
November 7, 2021
  • 4:00pm
  • Finger Lakes Community College

Boots on Mars in 10 Years!

Getting to Mars to Save Spaceship Earth

Featuring

Dava Newman,

Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at MIT in Aeronautics and Astronautics

Details

MODERATOR: Evan Dawson
  • DESCRIPTION:

Out ride the sons of Terra, / Far drives the thundering jet, / Up leaps the race of Earthmen / Out, far, and onward yet — Robert Heinlein, The Green Hills of Earth

Near, but far, is the planet Mars. How will we get astronauts there? What will they do? Why will they do it?
Dava Newman can supply the answers. Dr. Newman is the Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Aeronautics and Astronautics. Grab your hat now: her research expertise is in multidisciplinary aerospace biomedical engineering investigating human performance across the spectrum of gravity. She is a leader in advanced space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, and a strong promoter of the BioSuit, a new design offering astronauts highly improved range of motion by providing necessary atmospheric pressure through compression directly on the skin via the suit's textile weave, patterning, and materials rather than with pressurized gas.  Focused on leadership development, innovation and space policy, Newman was the principal investigator on four spaceflight missions.

She served as NASA Deputy Administrator from 2015–2017, and along with the NASA Administrator was responsible for articulating the agency's vision, providing leadership and policy direction, and representing NASA to the White House, Congress, international space agencies, and industry. The first female engineer and scientist to serve in this role, she was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. She has long championed the human journey to Mars, as well as other aeronautic and astronautic technology and innovation, as well as education on the benefits of space research and exploration.

We are thrilled to have her at the Forum. We shall try to keep up!

Dava Newman's BIO:

Dava Newman is the Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Aeronautics and Astronautics, a Harvard–MIT Health, Sciences, and Technology faculty member and Director of the MIT Portugal Program. Dr. Newman’s research expertise is in multidisciplinary aerospace biomedical engineering investigating human performance across the spectrum of gravity. She is a leader in advanced space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, leadership development, innovation and space policy. Newman was the principal investigator on 4 spaceflight missions. The Space Shuttle Dynamic Load Sensors (DLS) experiment measured astronaut- induced disturbances of the microgravity environment on mission STS-62. An advanced system, the Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors experiment, flew on board the Russian Mir Space Station from 1996– 1998. Dr. Newman was a Co-Investigator on the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) that flew to space on STS-42 to measure astronaut mental workload and fine motor control in microgravity. She also developed the MICR0-G space flight experiment to provide a novel smart sensor suite and study human adaptation in extreme environments. She is the MIT PI on the Gravity Loading Countermeasure Suit, or Skinsuit, onboard the International Space Station as an ESA technology demonstration 2015-2017. Best known for her second skin BioSuitTM planetary EVA system, her advanced spacesuits inventions are now being applied to “soft suits/exoskeletons” to study and enhance locomotion on Earth. Recent research focuses on Earth Systems, namely ocean through near-space subsystems to accelerate solutions for climate and oceans by curating near-space satellite data to make the world work for 100% of humanity. Newman is the author of Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design, and has published more than 250 papers in journals and refereed conferences, and holds numerous compression technology patents. She has supervised 90 graduate student theses and supervised and mentored over 200 undergraduate researchers.

She served as NASA Deputy Administrator from 2015–2017, and along with the NASA Administrator was responsible for articulating the agency's vision, providing leadership and policy direction, and representing NASA to the White House, Congress, international space agencies, and industry. Dr. Newman was the first female engineer and scientist to serve in this role and was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. She championed the human journey to Mars, technology and innovation, and education. Her National Academies service includes membership on the Space Studies Board, two terms on the Aeronautics Space and Engineering Board, the Committee on Human Spaceflight Technical Panel, and a discipline panel on the Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space. Recent honors include: Lowell Thomas Award, Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, AIAA Fellow, AIAA Jeffries Aerospace Medicine and Life Sciences Research Award, and Women in Aerospace Leadership Award. She holds a Ph.D. in aerospace biomedical engineering from MIT, M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering and technology and policy from MIT, and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame.

November 7, 2021
  • 4:00pm
  • FLCC
Boots on Mars in 10 Years!

Boots on Mars in 10 Years!

Getting to Mars to Save Spaceship Earth

Featuring

Dava Newman,

Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at MIT in Aeronautics and Astronautics

Details

MODERATOR: Evan Dawson
  • DESCRIPTION:

Out ride the sons of Terra, / Far drives the thundering jet, / Up leaps the race of Earthmen / Out, far, and onward yet — Robert Heinlein, The Green Hills of Earth

Near, but far, is the planet Mars. How will we get astronauts there? What will they do? Why will they do it?
Dava Newman can supply the answers. Dr. Newman is the Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Aeronautics and Astronautics. Grab your hat now: her research expertise is in multidisciplinary aerospace biomedical engineering investigating human performance across the spectrum of gravity. She is a leader in advanced space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, and a strong promoter of the BioSuit, a new design offering astronauts highly improved range of motion by providing necessary atmospheric pressure through compression directly on the skin via the suit's textile weave, patterning, and materials rather than with pressurized gas.  Focused on leadership development, innovation and space policy, Newman was the principal investigator on four spaceflight missions.

She served as NASA Deputy Administrator from 2015–2017, and along with the NASA Administrator was responsible for articulating the agency's vision, providing leadership and policy direction, and representing NASA to the White House, Congress, international space agencies, and industry. The first female engineer and scientist to serve in this role, she was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. She has long championed the human journey to Mars, as well as other aeronautic and astronautic technology and innovation, as well as education on the benefits of space research and exploration.

We are thrilled to have her at the Forum. We shall try to keep up!

Dava Newman's BIO:

Dava Newman is the Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Aeronautics and Astronautics, a Harvard–MIT Health, Sciences, and Technology faculty member and Director of the MIT Portugal Program. Dr. Newman’s research expertise is in multidisciplinary aerospace biomedical engineering investigating human performance across the spectrum of gravity. She is a leader in advanced space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, leadership development, innovation and space policy. Newman was the principal investigator on 4 spaceflight missions. The Space Shuttle Dynamic Load Sensors (DLS) experiment measured astronaut- induced disturbances of the microgravity environment on mission STS-62. An advanced system, the Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors experiment, flew on board the Russian Mir Space Station from 1996– 1998. Dr. Newman was a Co-Investigator on the Mental Workload and Performance Experiment (MWPE) that flew to space on STS-42 to measure astronaut mental workload and fine motor control in microgravity. She also developed the MICR0-G space flight experiment to provide a novel smart sensor suite and study human adaptation in extreme environments. She is the MIT PI on the Gravity Loading Countermeasure Suit, or Skinsuit, onboard the International Space Station as an ESA technology demonstration 2015-2017. Best known for her second skin BioSuitTM planetary EVA system, her advanced spacesuits inventions are now being applied to “soft suits/exoskeletons” to study and enhance locomotion on Earth. Recent research focuses on Earth Systems, namely ocean through near-space subsystems to accelerate solutions for climate and oceans by curating near-space satellite data to make the world work for 100% of humanity. Newman is the author of Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design, and has published more than 250 papers in journals and refereed conferences, and holds numerous compression technology patents. She has supervised 90 graduate student theses and supervised and mentored over 200 undergraduate researchers.

She served as NASA Deputy Administrator from 2015–2017, and along with the NASA Administrator was responsible for articulating the agency's vision, providing leadership and policy direction, and representing NASA to the White House, Congress, international space agencies, and industry. Dr. Newman was the first female engineer and scientist to serve in this role and was awarded the NASA Distinguished Service Medal. She championed the human journey to Mars, technology and innovation, and education. Her National Academies service includes membership on the Space Studies Board, two terms on the Aeronautics Space and Engineering Board, the Committee on Human Spaceflight Technical Panel, and a discipline panel on the Decadal Survey on Biological and Physical Sciences in Space. Recent honors include: Lowell Thomas Award, Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar, AIAA Fellow, AIAA Jeffries Aerospace Medicine and Life Sciences Research Award, and Women in Aerospace Leadership Award. She holds a Ph.D. in aerospace biomedical engineering from MIT, M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering and technology and policy from MIT, and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame.

MIT Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics; aerospace biomedical engineer, inventor of BioSuitTM planetary spacesuit; NASA Deputy Administrator 2015-2017

To learn more about Dava Newman:

2020-2021 Season Postponed

Regretfully, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020-21 Canandaigua Forum has been postponed. Happily, all four great programs have been rescheduled for 2021-22.